“Boxed Wines” you say?

That’s not classy!

Wine doesn’t belong in a Box!

This type of snobbery is the reason I didn’t drink wine for the 1st 30 years of my life!

But after I turned 30 I started embracing my inner douche bag and immediately went straight to vintage wines out of my fine Riedel Vinum stemware. After wasting endless amounts of bottles of wines, after opening and only drinking one glass (even after trying to vacuum seal the lid back on with the latest gizmo) I found myself frustrated at literally pouring $20 to $30 down the drain almost daily at one point. So I set out to find a better solution, one that many one “oenophile” have dreaded over for centuries dating back to the roman empire (you weren’t there either, so how do you know?).

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On a work related business trip I found myself in Anaheim, California at a Ralph’s convenience store, looking to buy the usual essentials for my week long stay (with free breakfast buffet) at a local embassy suites. I usually buy a Gallon of Water, Bag of Skinny Pop Popcorn, Turkey Jerky and a few bottles of my favorite under $10 Bottle of Vino (usually 1 bottle per day)… So on a 7 day trip I was set to bite the bullet and knock it down to only 5 bottles of wine and bear through drinking a 24 hour old opened bottle of Mirassou Pinot Noir.

Ralphs

My normal routine was to finish my day of meetings, find a local (non-chain) restaurant in the area and make their during happy hour. Have a few app’s, a light meal and glass or 2 of happy hour or house wine. Head back to my hotel room, get out of my clown suit turn on some random weather channel reality show or whatever is on in Anaheim at that time (anything but bad news) and open up a bottle of my vino. I use to pride myself on being able to down an entire bottle of wine (solo) and coined the phrase “If a Glass is Good, Imagine What a Bottle Does for your Heart”. Now that I stopped downing my bottles like 2 Chainz in the VIP Section of an Atlanta Strip club, I would find myself only able to finish 1/2 of the bottle max.

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I said to myself. “Self! There has to be a better Way?”

5 Reasons I Started Drinking Boxed Wines and You Should Too:

  1. Shitty Wines come in Bottles Too! Just because the juice is encased in a glass case doesn’t guarantee it will be a good wine. We have all had our experiences with a bad bottle of wine. So lets just admit its at least a level playing field, and agree that Shitty & Good wines can possibly come in both “Boxes & Bottles”
  2. Boxing actually allows less room for error than bottling! Don’t believe Me? Check out this article by New York Times Columnist Eric Asimov where he states “No matter how elegant or handy those containers may be, their fixed volumes permit air to enter when wine is removed. Air attacks and degrades wine, making it imperative to drink up what remains, usually within no more than a few days. The bag-in-a-box, to use the unlovely industry term, resolves this problem of oxidation by eliminating space for air to occupy. Wine can stay fresh for weeks once it has been opened. But while the packaging may be ingenious, what’s inside has been a problem.”
  3. Get 4 Bottles for the Price of 1! Look I love a fine glass of wine, as much as the next guy. But when I’m sitting at home grilling up some Turkey Chili Cheese Dogs on a Monday afternoon, as my wife watches the Bachelor do I really need a $30 bottle of wine? I hit the spout, and pour that fresh wine I opened a week ago in my Fancy Ass Riedel Vinum Wine Glass and act like I’m at a Michelin 5 Star Restaurant.
  4. Being Green is Cool! Look, I honestly don’t really give a shit about being green when it comes to drinking wine, and I haven’t glued a million wine corks together to build a dog house or something weird like that. But hey, if it also helps Mother Earth and helps me get my point across and up to 5 reason’s I’m going to run with it. According to Katie Kelly Bell who wrote “The Best In Boxed Wines: Thinking Inside The Box” on Forbes.com she stated “Before you dismiss the idea of boxed wines as a tasteless (on many levels) suggestion, consider this: boxed wine stays fresh a minimum of four weeks, it’s shatter-proof, portable, will never have cork taint, and is more environmentally conscious.In fact the total energy used to produce one box is about 1/3 the energy required to produce a glass bottle, leaving a carbon footprint one-half the size that of a wine bottle.”
  5. Because it Taste So Damn Good! Look! The Bottom Line is, if it I dint like the way it taste, I don’t care if it came in the cup Jesus passed around at the last supper I wouldn’t drink it it. So if one box of my favorite boxed wine = 3L and cost me $24.99, that’s the equivalent of having to buy 4 – $6.25 Bottles of Wine. Which I can almost guarantee will taste like old cat piss regardless of the glass you pour it in. Check out Katie’s post linked above to read some additional reviews on several boxed wines by normal wine drinkers not Master Sommelier Candidates.

Bottom Line is if You Have to Try a Boxed Wine, You My Friend are “SIMPLY SNOBBY”

So Whats my Fine Box of Choice?

Before I Unveil my Box of Choice “Allow Me to Do a Proper Introduction”:

Cabernet Sauvignon

WINE ENTHUSIAST BEST BUYS
2010 California Cabernet Sauvignon
2008 California Cabernet Sauvignon – 84 Points

2007 Central Coast Cabernet Sauvignon
2006 Paso Robles Cabernet Sauvignon
2004 Paso Robles Cabernet Sauvignon
2003 Paso Robles Cabernet Sauvignon
2002 Paso Robles Cabernet Sauvignon

GOLD MEDALS
2009 California Cabernet Sauvignon – 2011 Winemaker Challenge
2008 California Cabernet Sauvignon – 2010 Finger Lakes International Wine Competition

2008 California Cabernet Sauvignon – 2010 San Diego International Wine Competition
2008 California Cabernet Sauvignon – 2010 World Value Wine Challenge

 

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CABERNET SAUVIGNON

Valle Central, Chile

Black Box Wines Cabernet Sauvignon displays lovely aromas of black currants, with hints of mocha and toasty oak. Black cherry and chocolate flavors come together with smooth tannins, leading to a soft, lingering finish.

Delicious with filet mignon, roast duck, pork tenderloin or mushroom ravioli.

Download Tasting Notes